Invincible – How the French Gave the World the 74

By Philip K. Allan

In 1747, the French dispatched a vital convoy of thirty merchantmen to carry reinforcements and supplies to their troops in North America. They were being protected by a small naval force, including four ships of the line. On the 14th of May, off Cape Finisterre in Spain, the convoy was intercepted by a much larger British force detached from the Channel Fleet. The French warships fought bravely to protect their charges, but outnumbered as they were, they were decisively defeated.

This minor action might have gone unnoticed by all but a few naval historians, were it not for the fact that it was the first time that the British encountered a new type of warship. The Royal Navy had considerable difficulty in defeating one of their French opponents in particular. It was a large two-decked ship of the line called Invincible that proved particularly troublesome. She put up such heroic resistance that at one stage she was engaged by no less than six Royal Navy ships. The Invincible was one of a revolutionary new French design that was soon to dominate the navies of the world. Like all ships of the time, she was identified by the number of guns that she carried, which was 74.

Read the full article at Philip K. Allan’s website.

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